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The recommended route to visit power spots in Nihombashi, where the Seven Lucky Gods are enshrined

Takes 1-1.5 hours

As the name suggests, the Seven Lucky Gods is a group of the gods of fortune. Namely, Jurojin, Bishamonten, Fukurokuju, Ebisushin, Benzaiten, Daikokushin and Hoteison.
Handed down among the general public for approx. 500 years, the Seven Lucky Gods is one of the most popular folk beliefs in Japan.
It is said that visits to the shrines of these seven gods will bring good luck with school work, money, longevity and others.
Above all, the pilgrimage route to the shrines of the Seven Lucky Gods scattered throughout Nihombashi is the quickest in Japan to visit all seven gods.
Visit these seven power spots to attain good fortune.

01. Hosho Benzaiten (on the grounds of Suitengu Shrine)

01. Hosho Benzaiten (on the grounds of Suitengu Shrine)

Benzaiten, the only female god among the Seven Lucky Gods, is enshrined here. During the Edo period, the lord of the Kurume Domain competed with the lord of the Kaga Domain in Noh skills. The former made a wish to Benzaiten at this shrine before the competition, thanks to which he won. Consequently, Benzaiten is still worshipped today as a god who brings good luck with arts, school, work and money.
Address: 2-4-1 Nihombashi-Kakigaracho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo
Access from hotel: 5 minutes

3 minutes from Hosho Benzaiten
02. Matsushima Shrine

02. Matsushima Shrine

Daikokushin, said to be the god of fertility and agriculture, is enshrined here. This god was enshrined here prior to 1321, when the area was a landlocked bay. The shrine was on an island with dense pine trees. It is said that the lamps lit on this island every night served as a landmark that helped sailors to travel safely.
Address: 2-4-1 Nihombashi-Kakigaracho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo
Access from hotel: 8 minutes

4 minutes from Matsushima Shrine
03. Suehiro Shrine

03. Suehiro Shrine

Bishamonten, also called the god of war or god of warriors, brings good luck in battles and games. According to legend, he was enshrined here prior to 1596. In addition to being worshipped by samurai families, Bishamonten was believed to be a healer of illnesses. Therefore, the worshippers at this shrine make many different wishes, including ones for protection from evil, better economic fortune, wealth and prosperity, not to mention recovery from illness.
Address: 2-25-20 Nihombashi-Ningyocho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo
Access from hotel: 11 minutes

3 minutes from Suehiro Shrine
04. Kasama Inari Shrine

04. Kasama Inari Shrine

The Tokyo Bessha (branch) of Kasama Inari Shrine, one of the three major shrines in Japan, was established in 1859. Jurojin, the deity enshrined here, is a guardian god of wealth and longevity that leads people in the direction of a better destiny, specializing in guidance and good luck, as well as prolonging lives.
Address: 2-11-6 Nihombashi-Hamacho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo
Access from hotel: 8 minutes

10 minutes from Kasama Inari Shrine
05. Suginomori Shrine

05. Suginomori Shrine

Ebisushin, a god said to bring prosperity in business and grain production, is enshrined here. According to legend, this shrine was founded more than 1,000 years ago. During the Edo period, it was a venue for Tomi Kuji, the original lottery in Japan. Therefore it attracts many worshippers who wish for good luck with the lottery.
Address: 1-10-2 Nihombashi-Horidomecho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo
Access from hotel: 13 minutes

7 minutes from Suginomori Shrine
06. Koami Shrine

06. Koami Shrine

Koami Shrine is the grand head shrine for good luck and protection from evil. It was established about 550 years ago. This shrine is commonly known as Tokyo Zeni Arai Benten, where Fukurokuju, the god of wealth, economic fortune and longevity, and Benzaiten, the god of economic fortune and arts and culture, are enshrined. They are worshipped as gods of good luck and protection from evil partly because the shrine was not damaged during the war, which is miraculous, and partly because all of the soldiers who received good luck charms from this shrine before going off to war returned alive.
Address: 16-23 Nihombashi-Koamicho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo
Access from hotel: 13 minutes

5 minutes from Koami Shrine
07. Chanoki Shrine

07. Chanoki Shrine

During the Edo Period, there was a feudal lord's mansion (Sakura Domain) of approx. 10,000 square meters and this shrine was dedicated to its guardian god. This god was worshiped as the god of fire prevention, because there were no fires in the surrounding area, not to mention the mansion itself. Hoteison is worshipped as a god of wealth and harmony.
Address: 1-12-11 Nihombashi-Ningyocho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo
Access from hotel: 13 minutes

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